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Religion in Japan : Unity and Diversity

Religion in Japan : Unity and Diversity

ISBN 9781133934813
Edition 5
Publication Date
Publisher Cengage
Author(s)
Overview
1. Introduction. Five Major Religious Strands. Unity and Diversity. 2. Persistent Themes in Japanese Religious History. The Closeness of Human Beings, Gods, and Nature. The Religious Character of the Family. The Importance of Purification, Specific Rituals, and Amulets. The Prominence of Local Festivals and Individual Cults. The Pervasiveness of Religion in Everyday Life. The Intimate Bond Between Religion and the Nation. The Traditional Worldview. PART I: The Formation of Religion in Japan. 3. The Prehistoric Heritage. The Beginnings of Japanese Culture. The Evidence for the Earliest Religion in Japan. Dealing with the Dead: Burial, Jars, and Tombs. Fertility: Rice and Figurines. Kami from Heaven and Female Shamans. 4. The Kami Tradition. The Early Kami Tradition in Japan. Tradition and Religion in Cross-Cultural Perspective' Tradition as Illusion. Features of the Kami Tradition: Sacred Spaces. The Mythological Tradition: Yin, Yang, Yamato Rulers, and Tension Between Kami and Buddhas. The Ritual Tradition: Enthronement, Purification, Festivals, and Divinations. 5. Early Buddhism in Japan: Indian, Chinese, and Korean Influence. Buddhism: The Doctrine Most Excellent Enters Japan. The Power of Buddhism: Protection, Healing, and Rites for the Dead. The First Nuns and Monks in Japan. The First Buddhist Temples in Japan. Indian Buddhism in Japan. Popular Preaching: Dharma, Karma, and Miraculous Stories. State Buddhism and Popular Buddhism. 6. Daoism and Confucianism: Chinese Importations. Two Chinese 'Ways'. The 'Way' of Daoism and the Chinese Worldview. Daoism and Daoist Influence in Japan. The Bureau of Yin and Yang. The 'Way' of Confucianism and Japan: Shotoku's 'Constitution'. Confucian Influence: A 'University' and Worship of Confucius. Confucianism and Japanese Society. Daoism and Confucianism as Japanese Traditions. 7. Folk Religion: Beliefs and Practices Outside Organized Religion. The Little Tradition and the Great Tradition. The God of the Everlasting World. Wizards, Shamans, Sacred Mountains, Magic, and Divination. The Sound of Silence and Buddhist Clothing. Folk, Tradition, and Religion. 8. Interaction in Early Religion in Japan. A Multipolar System. Religion in Japan as a Tree. The Formation of a Distinctively Japanese Religious Heritage. PART II: The Development and Elaboration of Religion in Japan. 9. The Development of a Japanese Buddhism: Shingon and Tendai. The New Buddhism of the Heian Period. Shingon: Esoteric Buddhism in Japan, Ritual over Philosophy, and Enlightenment in This Body. Kukai and Esoteric Buddhism. Mantras, Mandalas, and Goma (Fire Rite). Tendai: The Lotus Sutra, Proper Ordination for Monks, and Buddhahood for All Humans. Saicho and Tiantai. Mahayana and the Lotus Sutra. Buddhahood for All Humans, and Esoteric Rites. The Development of Japanese Buddhism, and Religious Trends. 10. The Shrine Tradition, and Shugendo. The Kasuga-Kofukuji Shrine-Temple Complex. Ise Shrine: Purity, Ritual, and Taboos. Shugendo: Mountain Ascetics and Religion for the People. The Kami Tradition and the Shrine Tradition. 11. Elaboration Within Japanese Buddhism: Pure Land, Nichiren, and Zen Buddhism. Buddhism: From Heian to Kamakura Times. The Pure Land Sects: Faith in Amida and the Recitation of the Nenbutsu.. Nichiren: Faith in the Lotus Sutra as the Exclusive National Buddhism. The Zen Sects: Enlightenment Through Meditation. Dogen: Sitting in Meditation. Zen: Institutional and Artistic Developments. 12. From Kami and Shrine Tradition to Shinto. Kami Secondary to Buddhas. Buddhas Secondary to Kami. Yoshida Kanetomo: Shinto as the Essence of Japan. Shinto Shrines, Buddhist Temples, and Multiplexes. 13. The Appearance of Christianity in Japan. The Introduction of Christianity into Japan. The Acceptance of Christianity in Japan. The Expulsion of Christianity. The Significance of the Christian Century. 14. The Five Traditions: Development and Mutual Influence. PART IIII: Continuity and Discontinuity in Japanese Religions. 15. Buddhism, Neo-Confucianism, and
Overview
1. Introduction. Five Major Religious Strands. Unity and Diversity. 2. Persistent Themes in Japanese Religious History. The Closeness of Human Beings, Gods, and Nature. The Religious Character of the Family. The Importance of Purification, Specific Rituals, and Amulets. The Prominence of Local Festivals and Individual Cults. The Pervasiveness of Religion in Everyday Life. The Intimate Bond Between Religion and the Nation. The Traditional Worldview. PART I: The Formation of Religion in Japan. 3. The Prehistoric Heritage. The Beginnings of Japanese Culture. The Evidence for the Earliest Religion in Japan. Dealing with the Dead: Burial, Jars, and Tombs. Fertility: Rice and Figurines. Kami from Heaven and Female Shamans. 4. The Kami Tradition. The Early Kami Tradition in Japan. Tradition and Religion in Cross-Cultural Perspective' Tradition as Illusion. Features of the Kami Tradition: Sacred Spaces. The Mythological Tradition: Yin, Yang, Yamato Rulers, and Tension Between Kami and Buddhas. The Ritual Tradition: Enthronement, Purification, Festivals, and Divinations. 5. Early Buddhism in Japan: Indian, Chinese, and Korean Influence. Buddhism: The Doctrine Most Excellent Enters Japan. The Power of Buddhism: Protection, Healing, and Rites for the Dead. The First Nuns and Monks in Japan. The First Buddhist Temples in Japan. Indian Buddhism in Japan. Popular Preaching: Dharma, Karma, and Miraculous Stories. State Buddhism and Popular Buddhism. 6. Daoism and Confucianism: Chinese Importations. Two Chinese 'Ways'. The 'Way' of Daoism and the Chinese Worldview. Daoism and Daoist Influence in Japan. The Bureau of Yin and Yang. The 'Way' of Confucianism and Japan: Shotoku's 'Constitution'. Confucian Influence: A 'University' and Worship of Confucius. Confucianism and Japanese Society. Daoism and Confucianism as Japanese Traditions. 7. Folk Religion: Beliefs and Practices Outside Organized Religion. The Little Tradition and the Great Tradition. The God of the Everlasting World. Wizards, Shamans, Sacred Mountains, Magic, and Divination. The Sound of Silence and Buddhist Clothing. Folk, Tradition, and Religion. 8. Interaction in Early Religion in Japan. A Multipolar System. Religion in Japan as a Tree. The Formation of a Distinctively Japanese Religious Heritage. PART II: The Development and Elaboration of Religion in Japan. 9. The Development of a Japanese Buddhism: Shingon and Tendai. The New Buddhism of the Heian Period. Shingon: Esoteric Buddhism in Japan, Ritual over Philosophy, and Enlightenment in This Body. Kukai and Esoteric Buddhism. Mantras, Mandalas, and Goma (Fire Rite). Tendai: The Lotus Sutra, Proper Ordination for Monks, and Buddhahood for All Humans. Saicho and Tiantai. Mahayana and the Lotus Sutra. Buddhahood for All Humans, and Esoteric Rites. The Development of Japanese Buddhism, and Religious Trends. 10. The Shrine Tradition, and Shugendo. The Kasuga-Kofukuji Shrine-Temple Complex. Ise Shrine: Purity, Ritual, and Taboos. Shugendo: Mountain Ascetics and Religion for the People. The Kami Tradition and the Shrine Tradition. 11. Elaboration Within Japanese Buddhism: Pure Land, Nichiren, and Zen Buddhism. Buddhism: From Heian to Kamakura Times. The Pure Land Sects: Faith in Amida and the Recitation of the Nenbutsu.. Nichiren: Faith in the Lotus Sutra as the Exclusive National Buddhism. The Zen Sects: Enlightenment Through Meditation. Dogen: Sitting in Meditation. Zen: Institutional and Artistic Developments. 12. From Kami and Shrine Tradition to Shinto. Kami Secondary to Buddhas. Buddhas Secondary to Kami. Yoshida Kanetomo: Shinto as the Essence of Japan. Shinto Shrines, Buddhist Temples, and Multiplexes. 13. The Appearance of Christianity in Japan. The Introduction of Christianity into Japan. The Acceptance of Christianity in Japan. The Expulsion of Christianity. The Significance of the Christian Century. 14. The Five Traditions: Development and Mutual Influence. PART IIII: Continuity and Discontinuity in Japanese Religions. 15. Buddhism, Neo-Confucianism, and

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